NCWGE Marks 42nd Title IX Anniversary with Briefing on Preventing Campus Sexual Assault 

In honor of Title IX’s 42nd anniversary, the National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education held a panel discussion on the history and role of Title IX enforcement including recent action taken by the Department of Education and White House Taskforce on Preventing Campus Sexual Assault. The discussion was held on June 19 in the Rayburn House Office Building and featured Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Lisa Maatz of AAUW, Lisalyn Jacobs of Legal Momentum, Neena Chaudhry of the National Women’s Law Center, Dana Bolger of Know Your IX, and Katie Hanna of the Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence. Over 80 people attended representing 14 congressional offices and 8 senate offices.

A recent White House Task Force report produced resources to help students better understand Title IX’s role in campus sexual assault. And the newly created website NotAlone.gov details for students what responsibilities schools have under Title IX to respond to sexual violence and aims to ensure that students know their rights and how to file a complaint. The U.S. Department of Education is investigating more than 60 schools for Title IX violations related to sexual violence. When campus environments are hostile because of sexual harassment, assault, or violence, students cannot learn, and they miss out on educational opportunities. Campus sexual assault survivor Dana Bolger helped found a campaign to educate college students about their rights under Title IX. Bolger says that school officials suggested she put her education on hold until after her assailant graduated, but once she learned about Title IX, she realized that the school’s response was inappropriate. She decided to take action and complete her education.

“Historically, students have not understood that they had protections under Title IX or what those protections were,” Lisalyn Jacobs, vice president for government relations at Legal Momentum, said at the NCWGE briefing.
>> AUW’s blog reporting on the NCWGE briefing

NCWGE Webinar on School Discipline Guidance and Title IX

On April 1, 2014, NCWGE cosponsored a webinar with American Federation of Teachers, National Education Association and American Association of University Women on “School Discipline Guidance and Title IX.” The webinar featured Carolyn Seugling and Amanda K. Dallo, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education; Renee Bradley, Positive Behavioral Interventions Strategies and Supports, U.S. Department of Education; Dr. William A. Howe, State Title IX Coordinator/Civil Rights Compliance Multicultural Education/Culturally Responsive Education CT State Department of Education; Connie Cordovilla, American Federation of Teachers; Donna M. Harris-Aikens and Catherine V. Beane, National Education Association. The webinar had 520 folks registered, 317 attended, 47 states represented, and 281 unique institutions. NCWGE received very positive feedback from participants who appreciated how the discipline guidance relates to the work being done to reduce sex discrimination in schools.

The U.S. Department of Education issued guidance to school districts explaining schools’ obligation under the Civil Rights Act to administer discipline without discriminating on the basis of race, color, and national origin. The webinar discussed schools’ obligations outlined in the discipline guidance, provided suggestions for increasing positive behavior by students and addressing misbehavior when it occurs, and provided an explanation of how the discipline guidance interacts with Title IX, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex by recipients of federal financial assistance in their education programs or activities.
>> View the webinar here

NCWGE Calls on Senate and House Leaders to Reauthorize Perkins Act

This important legislation provides resource for college and career readiness for secondary and community college students nationwide. The NCWGE recommendations seek to simplify the equity language in the Carl D. Perkins Act and to provide incentives and accountability to close equity gaps in program participation, completion, achievement and transition in career and technical education (CTE) programs of study.
>> Download the letter

CUNY Settles Pregnant Student's Discrimination Complaint

Thanks to complaint initiated by the National Women’s Law Center, City University of New York adopts new policy to protect students who are pregnant and parents.
>> Press release

Education Data Show Gender Gap
in Career Preparation

More than forty years after Title IX outlawed sex segregation in education, women and girls are still sorely underrepresented in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs that are nontraditional for their gender. Click here to see the research.
>> Download PDF

Title IX at 40: Working to Ensure
Gender Equity in Education

You've heard about Title IX and athletics, but Title IX is about much more! In honor of the 40th anniversary of the law’s passage, NCWGE published a comprehensive report to help give educators, parents, students, and lawmakers a better understanding of Title IX’s impact and challenges that remain in many areas of education, including:

Download complete report [pdf, 3MB]
Download executive summary

Career-Technical EducationAthleticsScience-Tech-Eng-Math
Pregnant-Parenting StudentsSexual HarassmentSingle-Sex Education

 

Summary of NCWGE Briefing:
Supporting Teens with Big Dreams:
Title IX and the Pregnant and Parenting Students Access to Education Act
 

Read a summary of NCWGE’s hill briefing held in honor of the 41st anniversary of Title IX, "Title IX, Pregnant and Parenting Students, and ESEA: Supporting Young Parents to Achieve Their Educational Goals." It brought together teen parents, advocates, and service providers to explore the promise of Title IX's protections for pregnant and parenting students and to explain the implications of the currently pending Pregnant and Parenting Students Access to Education Act (PPSAE Act). Panelists included Anurima Bhargava, Chief of the Educational Opportunities Section of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and Kimberly Inez McGuire of the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health; Lara S. Kaufmann of the National Women’s Law Center moderated the discussion. For more information on rights for pregnant and parenting students, read NCWGE’s report chapter on pregnant and parenting students.


About NCWGE

The National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education (NCWGE) is a nonprofit organization of more than 50 groups dedicated to improving educational opportunities for girls and women. Our mission is to provide leadership in and advocate for the development of national education policies that benefit all women and girls. This site provides information on our coalition, current activities, updates on relevant federal education legislation, useful resources, and NCWGE publications.

NCWGE was formed in 1975 by representatives of national organizations concerned about the failure to issue regulations implementing Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. NCWGE was successful in mobilizing strong support for publication of the Title IX regulations by the then Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

NCWGE continues to be a major force in developing national education policies that benefit all women and girls, providing a valuable forum to share information and strategies to advance educational equity; advocating for women and girls regarding educational issues, including the interpretation and implementation
of Title IX; and monitoring the work of Congress and federal agencies on education policies and programs.

Statement of Purpose

The National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education is a nonprofit organization formed to educate the public about issues concerning equal rights for women and girls in education; to monitor the enforcement and administration of current legislation related to equal rights for women and girls in education; to perform and publish research and analysis of issues concerning equal rights for women and girls in education, and to take the steps necessary and proper to accomplish these purposes.